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Types of Traffic Foreign
Domestic
Traffic Direction Waterways
Ports

U.S. Waterway Data Title
Waterborne Commerce of the United States
Terminology

Types of Traffic

Foreign
Imports
Overseas: Inbound merchandise for direct consumption and entries into custom bonded storage and manufacturing warehouses originating in foreign countries other than Canada.
Canadian: Inbound merchandise for direct consumption and entries into custom bonded storage and manufacturing warehouses originating in Canada.

Exports
Overseas: Outbound domestic merchandise and re-export of foreign merchandise from a U.S. foreign trade zone destined for foreign countries other than Canada.
Canadian: Outbound domestic merchandise and re-export of foreign merchandise from a U.S. foreign trade zone destined for Canada
Intransit Merchandise: Inbound merchandise coming into the United States from a foreign country and shipped to a foreign country without having been entered as an import. Intransit merchandise is treated as an Import when unloaded from a vessel and as an Export when loaded onto a vessel.

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Domestic
Coastwise: Domestic traffic receiving a carriage over the ocean, or the Gulf of Mexico, (e.g. New Orleans to Baltimore, New York to Puerto Rico, San Francisco to Hawaii, Alaska to Hawaii). Traffic between Great Lakes ports and seacoast ports, when having a carriage over the ocean, is also termed Coastwise.
Lakewise: Waterborne traffic between the United States ports on the Great Lakes System. The Great Lakes System is treated as a separate waterway system rather than as a part of the inland waterway system. In comparing historical data for the Great Lakes System, one should note that prior to calendar year 1990, marine products, sand and gravel being moved from the Great Lakes to Great Lake destinations were classified as local traffic. From 1990 on, these activities are classified as lakewise traffic.
Internal: Vessel movements (origin and destination) which take place solely on inland waterways. An inland waterway is one geographically located within the boundaries of the contiguous 48 states or within the boundaries of the State of Alaska. The term "internal traffic" is also applied to these vessel movements: those which involve carriage on both inland waterways and the Great Lakes; those occurring between offshore areas and inland waterways (e.g., oil rig supplies and fish); and those taking place within Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay, Puget Sound, and the San Francisco Bay, which are considered internal bodies of water rather than arms of the ocean.
Intraport: Movement of freight within the confines of a port whether the port has one or several arms or channels included in the port definition. This traffic type will not include car-ferries and general ferries moving within a port.
Through: Movements transiting a waterway, or stretch thereof, as defined in the project description of individual tables, and having origins and desti- nations outside of the defined area.
Intra-waterway: Movements within the limits of a river, waterway or canal. This traffic will not include car-ferries and general ferries moving within a waterway or Corps project.
Intra-territory: Traffic between ports in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, U.S.A. which are considered a single unit.

Traffic Direction

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Waterways
Upbound: Traffic that moves in an upstream direction. For waterways without a characteristic monodirectional flow (e.g. the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway), "upbound" means in a northerly or easterly direction.
Downbound: Traffic that moves in a downstream direction. For waterways without a characteristic monodirectional flow, "downbound" means in a southerly or westerly direction.
Inbound: Traffic moving from one waterway into another where the destination is on the subject waterway.
Outbound: Traffic moving from one waterway into another where the origin is on the subject waterway.

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Ports
Receipts: Traffic moving from one location to another where the destination is within the limits of the subject port.
Shipments: Traffic moving from one location to another where the origin is within the limits of the subject port.
Commodity Descriptions: The first two digits of the Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center (WCSC)publication codes correspond with the Lock Performance Monitoring System (LPMS) commodity codes. Both LPMS and WCSC codes were standardized to reflect the hierarchical structure of the Standard Industrial Trade Classification (SITC) Revision 3 commodity codes. SITC, Rev. 3 commodity codes conform to the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System (HS). Using SITC, Rev. 3 allows direct comparisons with U.S. imports and exports, as well as with commodity movements of other countries.
Tons: The tonnage figures provided throughout the Waterborne Commerce of the United States (WCUS) Parts 1-5 represent short tons (2000 pounds). Where noted, tonnage figures are rounded to the nearest thousand tons. A zero represents less than 500 tons but more than zero. Dashes mean zero tons. Columns and rows may not add up exactly to totals and subtotals due to rounding.
Ton-Miles:Water carriage ton-miles were first compiled and published in calendar year 1962. The distances used are statute miles. Domestic and foreign ton-miles are calculated by multiplying the tons of commerce being moved by the number of miles actually moved on the waterway or channel as defined for each freight table (e.g. 50 short tons moving 200 miles on a particular waterway would yield 10,000 ton-miles for that waterway). The ton-mile parameter measures the total activity on a waterway or channel. Ton-miles are not computed for ports.For rivers, channels and inland waterways the distances were computed from waterway survey maps and records of the Corps of Engineers.
Ton-miles are rounded to the nearest thousand.
Trip Ton-Miles: Trip ton-miles is a measure of a single waterway's contribution to the whole waterway system. Trip ton-miles are computed by identifying every commercial cargo-carrying vessel that has plied a particular inland waterway and summing the products of the tons times the total trip-miles for each vessel trip. "Trip-miles" is the total distance from origin (loading) to destination (unloading). For example, a barge carrying 1,200 tons of wheat might only travel 30 miles on the Illinois River but its total trip to New Orleans might be 1,000 miles. This trip would contribute 1,200,000 trip ton-miles to the Illinois River. Small rivers often contribute to the traffic on larger rivers. Published trip ton-miles do not include coastal and Great Lakes vessel movements.
Trans-shipments: Ports and offshore anchorage where cargo is moved from one vessel to another. These are: St. Lucia, Virgin Islands; Heald Bank off the Louisiana and Texas coasts; Chirqui Grande, Panama; Puerto Armuelles, Panama; and Hondo Platform-Pacific Ocean.


Contact for Additional Information:
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center
PO BOX 61280
New Orleans, LA 70161-1280
Point of Contact: WCSC (504) 862-1426 (504) 862-1441


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